Wednesday, December 28, 2005

Toronto Shootings: Gangbangers.

Canada: Not that its a surprise or anything considering the only paper so far to directly say that is the Ottawa Sun.

TORONTO -- A dispute between rival gangs may have led to the Boxing Day bloodbath in which an innocent 15-year-old girl was killed and six others wounded. Toronto police are now looking for up to 15 males in their late teens or early 20s in what they say was a shootout between two groups who confronted each other Monday night on a crowded sidewalk on Yonge St. next to the Eaton Centre. Investigators released few new details yesterday and would not say the gunfight was gang-related. However, a police source told the Sun detectives were investigating the possibility the shootout stemmed from an incident earlier in the day at a Scarborough housing complex. "There will be more repercussions (from the shooting)," said one gang insider, who didn't want to be identified fearing reprisal from gunmen. "This is not the end of this."
Paul Martin is talking about people being excluded or some liberal touchy feely nonsense.
MONTREAL — The deadly Boxing Day shootings in downtown Toronto were a “senseless and tragic act” by young people who feel marginalized by society, suggests Prime Minister Paul Martin. “Yesterday’s shootings in Toronto serve as a painful reminder that we cannot take our peace or our understanding for granted,” Martin said Tuesday during a service marking the Jewish holiday of Hanukkah. “I think, more than anything else, they demonstrate what are, in fact, the consequences of exclusion.”
Then later on, he and the mayor of Toronto blamed America and lack of gun control. Someone quickly called them on that.
John Thompson, a security analyst with the Toronto-based Mackenzie Institute, says the number of guns smuggled from the United States is a problem, but that Canada has a gang problem -- not a gun problem -- and that Canada should stop pointing the finger at the United States. "It's a cop out. It's an easy way of looking at one symptom rather than addressing a whole disease," Thompson said.
Liberal Toronto Star cheers on banning guns and task forces.
Unfortunately, there are no easy answers to the gun violence. Fighting this scourge requires a multi-faceted approach. More officers need to be deployed on the streets and at the malls. Judges must get tougher with sentencing repeat offenders charged with gun-related crimes. Other actions include more recreation programs, mentoring and job training for at-risk youths in crime-ridden or poverty-stricken neighbourhoods. For his part, Blair has adopted a positive approach by forming a task force to deal with gangs and guns in high crime areas. He is rightly supporting community policing, getting officers out of their cars and meeting the people in the areas they patrol. At the same time, Prime Minister Paul Martin has taken a bold step by promising to ban handguns in Canada.
Don't forget midnight basketball to make it complete. I am sure banning hand guns from law abiding citizens will make the criminals scared and gun violence will drop sharply. I see a mess of social programs being created with the results 10 years after that nothing has changed. The T-Star talks about gangs who are talking smack via DVD and an interesting tidbit about the downtown area.
A hip hop compilation DVD featuring young black men waving silver pistols and making chilling boasts about lethal reprisals and street supremacy is pivotal when trying to understand the gun violence that has plagued Toronto streets this year, police sources say. A portion of the DVD, called Premiere Edition Pt. 2, was used last fall as Crown evidence at a sentencing hearing in Superior Court to convince a judge of an accused man's gang affiliation. The man, Jermaine (J-Bug or Bugs) Grant, received an eight-year prison term for firearms offences. Beyond that, police allege two separate recordings that appear on the DVD, available over the Internet and at stores selling urban music, sparked a gang war that played out for months on Toronto streets this past year, mostly concentrated in the northwest part of the city. The DVD is expected to be used in evidence in future court cases involving suspected gang members. While unrelated, the images of the gun-wielding youths are nerve-jangling to watch in a week when Torontonians are reeling after a 15-year-old girl lost her life during a brazen Yonge St. gun battle between two armed groups of about 15 youths. Six others were injured, one man still in critical condition yesterday. Police are investigating whether the Yonge St. shootout is in any way linked to ongoing battles between street gangs in the city over control of the drug trade. The downtown area where the shooting took place is well-known for illicit drug dealing.
The way people are talking, you would have thought the place was Eden, now we start hearing its a place for drug dealing. That would explain the bad elements moving in.

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